In July/Aug 1970 my unit, C, 227th, AHB, 1 Cav, the Ghostriders, deployed 6 UH-1H Huey helicopters and crews to Tay Ninh West to support ARVN units which were mopping up the arms caches which the Cav ground units had discovered in Cambodia near the Parrots Beak area of South Vietnam. We  flew many sorties back and forth "over the fence" between Vietnam and Cambodia hauling ARVN troops and captured small arms.

One area that was still hotly contested was up near the vast Michelin rubber plantations around the Cambodian village of Sneoul. The rubber plantations were mostly abandoned at that time due to the intense fighting that raged in the area. We almost always encountered small arms fire and occasional 51MM AA fire in this AO. Our mission in the area lasted for several weeks and we were exhausted after 6-7 hours of nonstop flying in relentless heat and humidity.

Our saving grace was our temporary "quarters" in the jungle. We billeted in an old French plantation house with huge columns and equally huge rooms with high ceilings and even ceiling fans! Behind the house was a large stone swimming pool surrounded by a veranda where the previous French occupants probably sipped champagne and entertained. I remember sipping Scotch and dangling my feet in the pool on several occasions while we rehashed the days missions. Although the plantation house was somewhat run down it was "living the high life" to us and one could just imagine how it must have looked during the colonial period when it was probably built. It was maintained by a US Special Forces detachment which operated in the area. Those guys were really living the "life of Riley" as far as we were concerned.  

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Charles, it certainly sounds like you were living it up.  It's funny how when you are used to a crappy environment the smallest improvement can be a luxury.  I am sure that was the case here.  Thanks for sharing!!

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